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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4104802, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4104802
Research Article

The Relationship between Locomotive Syndrome and Depression in Community-Dwelling Elderly People

1Department of Rehabilitation, Osaka Kawasaki Rehabilitation University, 158 Mizuma, Kaizuka, Osaka 597-0104, Japan
2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, 811 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-8510, Japan
3Department of Strategic Surveillance for Functional Food and Comprehensive Traditional Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, 811 Kimiidera, Wakayama, Wakayama 641-8510, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Misa Nakamura; pj.ca.neukagikasawak@marumakan

Received 5 January 2017; Revised 5 March 2017; Accepted 15 March 2017; Published 5 April 2017

Academic Editor: Fulvio Lauretani

Copyright © 2017 Misa Nakamura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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