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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2007, Article ID 71863, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/71863
Research Article

Nessi: An EEG-Controlled Web Browser for Severely Paralyzed Patients

1Department of Computer Engineering, University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72076, Germany
2Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, Gartenstrasse 29, Tübingen 72074, Germany
3Graduate School of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, International Max Planck Research School, University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72076, Germany
4Fraunhofer FIRST, Intelligent Data Analysis Group, Berlin 12489, Germany
5Department of Computer Engineering, University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04103, Germany
6Human Cortical Physiology Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 28 February 2007; Accepted 26 June 2007

Academic Editor: Shangkai Gao

Copyright © 2007 Michael Bensch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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