Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience

Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience / 2007 / Article
Special Issue

Brain-Computer Interfaces: Towards Practical Implementations and Potential Applications

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Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 079642 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/79642

Robert Leeb, Doron Friedman, Gernot R. Müller-Putz, Reinhold Scherer, Mel Slater, Gert Pfurtscheller, "Self-Paced (Asynchronous) BCI Control of a Wheelchair in Virtual Environments: A Case Study with a Tetraplegic", Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience, vol. 2007, Article ID 079642, 8 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/79642

Self-Paced (Asynchronous) BCI Control of a Wheelchair in Virtual Environments: A Case Study with a Tetraplegic

Academic Editor: Andrzej Cichocki
Received18 Feb 2007
Accepted17 Jul 2007
Published10 Sep 2007

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to demonstrate for the first time that brain waves can be used by a tetraplegic to control movements of his wheelchair in virtual reality (VR). In this case study, the spinal cord injured (SCI) subject was able to generate bursts of beta oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) by imagination of movements of his paralyzed feet. These beta oscillations were used for a self-paced (asynchronous) brain-computer interface (BCI) control based on a single bipolar EEG recording. The subject was placed inside a virtual street populated with avatars. The task was to “go” from avatar to avatar towards the end of the street, but to stop at each avatar and talk to them. In average, the participant was able to successfully perform this asynchronous experiment with a performance of 90%, single runs up to 100%.

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Copyright © 2007 Robert Leeb et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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