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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 79826, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/79826
Research Article

The Self-Paced Graz Brain-Computer Interface: Methods and Applications

1Laboratory of Brain-Computer Interfaces, Institute for Knowledge Discovery, Graz University of Technology, Krenngasse 37, Graz 8010, Austria
2NeuroCenter Styria, Krenngasse 37/I, Graz 8010, Austria
3Intelligent Data Analysis Group, Fraunhofer-Institut für Rechnerarchitektur und Softwaretechnik, FIRST, Kekulestrasse 7, Berlin 12489, Germany
4Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 16, Graz 8010, Austria
5Aksioma - Institute for Contemporary Art, Neubergerjeva 25, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia

Received 25 February 2007; Revised 13 June 2007; Accepted 19 July 2007

Academic Editor: Fabio Babiloni

Copyright © 2007 Reinhold Scherer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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