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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2007, Article ID 84386, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/84386
Research Article

Towards Development of a 3-State Self-Paced Brain-Computer Interface

1Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
2Terry Fox Laboratory, British Columbia Cancer Research Center, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1L3
3Brain Interface Laboratory, Neil Squire Society, Suite 220, 2250 Boundary Road, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5M 3Z3
4Institute for Computing, Information & Cognitive Systems, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4

Received 15 February 2007; Accepted 22 August 2007

Academic Editor: Andrzej Cichocki

Copyright © 2007 Ali Bashashati et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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