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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 261010, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/261010
Research Article

Quantitative Tools for Examining the Vocalizations of Juvenile Songbirds

Laboratory of Biological Modeling, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 23 December 2011; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Francois Benoit Vialatte

Copyright © 2012 Cameron D. Wellock and George N. Reeke. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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