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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2012, Article ID 817485, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/817485
Research Article

From Occasional Choices to Inevitable Musts: A Computational Model of Nicotine Addiction

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469, Turkey

Received 30 March 2012; Revised 10 August 2012; Accepted 8 October 2012

Academic Editor: Wael El-Deredy

Copyright © 2012 Selin Metin and N. Serap Sengor. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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