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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 187417, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/187417
Research Article

A Biologically Inspired Computational Model of Basal Ganglia in Action Selection

Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi”, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna, Italy

Received 7 April 2015; Revised 13 July 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: José Alfredo Hernandez

Copyright © 2015 Chiara Baston and Mauro Ursino. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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