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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2015, Article ID 701237, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/701237
Research Article

A Neuroeconomics Analysis of Investment Process with Money Flow Information: The Error-Related Negativity

1School of Management, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
2School of Business Studies, Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, 4920311 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
3School of Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
4Neuromanagement Lab, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 13 April 2015; Accepted 25 April 2015

Academic Editor: Dongrong Xu

Copyright © 2015 Cuicui Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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