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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 715730, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/715730
Research Article

Sentiment Analysis Using Common-Sense and Context Information

1Department of Computer Science & Engineering, Swami Keshvanand Institute of Technology, Management & Gramothan (SKIT), Jaipur 302017, India
2Department of Computer and Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT), Malviya Nagar, Jaipur 302017, India

Received 19 August 2014; Revised 19 February 2015; Accepted 23 February 2015

Academic Editor: Christian W. Dawson

Copyright © 2015 Basant Agarwal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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