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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2016, Article ID 3861425, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3861425
Research Article

A Prototype SSVEP Based Real Time BCI Gaming System

1Department of Computer Science, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-415, LT-51368 Kaunas, Lithuania
2Department of Software Engineering, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-415, LT-51368 Kaunas, Lithuania

Received 15 November 2015; Revised 6 January 2016; Accepted 10 January 2016

Academic Editor: Victor H. C. de Albuquerque

Copyright © 2016 Ignas Martišius and Robertas Damaševičius. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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