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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2016, Article ID 4204385, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4204385
Research Article

The Brainarium: An Interactive Immersive Tool for Brain Education, Art, and Neurotherapy

1Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, Université de Grenoble, Grenoble, BSHM, 1251 av Centrale CS40700, 38058 Grenoble Cedex 9, France
2CNRS, UMR 5105, Grenoble, France
3Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition (CerCo), Université Paul Sabatier, Pavillon Baudot, Hopital Purpan, BP 25202, 31052 Toulouse Cedex 3, France
4CNRS, UMR 5549, Toulouse, France
5Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute of Neural Computation (INC), University of San Diego California, La Jolla, CA 92093-0559, USA

Received 13 April 2016; Accepted 30 June 2016

Academic Editor: Victor H. C. de Albuquerque

Copyright © 2016 Romain Grandchamp and Arnaud Delorme. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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