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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4760930, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4760930
Research Article

Antiherding in Financial Decision Increases Valuation of Return on Investment: An Event-Related Potential Study

1School of Management, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, China
2Neuromanagement Lab, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
3School of Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
4Business School, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
5Academy of Neuroeconomics and Neuromanagement at Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
6School of Business Studies, Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, Viana do Castelo, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Qingguo Ma

Received 29 November 2016; Accepted 27 April 2017; Published 28 May 2017

Academic Editor: Thomas DeMarse

Copyright © 2017 Cuicui Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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