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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5491296, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5491296
Research Article

Comparison of Brain Activation during Motor Imagery and Motor Movement Using fNIRS

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3Department of Family and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, 3737 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
4Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Hasan Ayaz; ude.lexerd@zaya.nasah

Received 9 December 2016; Revised 18 February 2017; Accepted 6 April 2017; Published 4 May 2017

Academic Editor: Mikhail A. Lebedev

Copyright © 2017 Alyssa M. Batula et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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