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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume 18, Issue 3, Pages 175-177
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2004/298064
Brief Communication

Does Whipworm Increase the Pathogenicity of Campylobacter jejuni? A Clinical Correlate of an Experimental Observation

Jennifer L Shin,1 Geoffrey W Gardiner,2 Wayne Deitel,3 and Gabor Kandel1

1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2Department of Pathology, St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
3Department of Radiology, St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Received 29 July 2003; Accepted 4 February 2004

Copyright © 2004 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, usually mild and self-limiting. No adequate hypothesis has yet been formulated to explain why in an otherwise healthy host this infection is occasionally severe. In a pig model, C jejuni has been shown to be pathogenic only in the presence of swine whipworm. A human case of life-threatening C jejuni colitis leading to toxic megacolon and acute renal failure, associated with concomitant whipworm (Trichuris suis) ova in the feces, is reported. The potential of T suis to potentiate C jejuni in humans deserves further study.