Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume 21, Issue 7, Pages 435-438
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/938978
Original Article

Do Physician Recommendations for Colorectal Cancer Screening Differ by Patient Age?

Maida J Sewitch,1 Caroline Fournier,2 Martin Dawes,3 Mark Yaffe,3 Linda Snell,4 Mark Roper,3 Patrizia Zanelli,5 and Alan Pavilanis3

1Department of Medicine, McGill University, Canada
2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Canada
3Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
4Division of General Internal Medicine and Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
5Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Critical Care, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Received 21 June 2006; Accepted 3 October 2006

Copyright © 2007 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer screening is underutilized, resulting in preventable morbidity and mortality. In the present study, age-related and other disparities associated with physicians’ delivery of colorectal cancer screening recommendations were examined. The present cross-sectional study included 43 physicians and 618 of their patients, aged 50 to 80 years, without past or present colorectal cancer. Of the 285 screen-eligible patients, 45% received a recommendation. Multivariate analyses revealed that, compared with younger nonde-pressed patients, older depressed patients were less likely to receive fecal occult blood test recommendations, compared with no recommendation (OR=0.31, 95% CI 0.09 to 1.02), as well as less likely to receive colonoscopy recommendations, compared with no recommendation (OR=0.14; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.66). Comorbidity and marital status were associated with delivery of fecal occult blood test and colonoscopy recommendations, respectively, compared with no recommendation. In summary, patient age and other characteristics appeared to influence physicians’ delivery of colorectal cancer screening and choice of modality.