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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume 2017, Article ID 8538974, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8538974
Research Article

Gastroenterology Curriculum in the Canadian Medical School System

Faculty of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to ThucNhi Tran Dang; ac.atreblau@ihncuht

Received 8 December 2016; Accepted 22 February 2017; Published 6 April 2017

Academic Editor: Geoffrey Williams

Copyright © 2017 ThucNhi Tran Dang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and Purpose. Gastroenterology is a diverse subspecialty that covers a wide array of topics. The preclinical gastroenterology curriculum is often the only formal training that medical students receive prior to becoming residents. There is no Canadian consensus on learning objectives or instructional methods and a general lack of awareness of curriculum at other institutions. This results in variable background knowledge for residents and lack of guidance for course development. Objectives. (1) Elucidate gastroenterology topics being taught at the preclinical level. (2) Determine instructional methods employed to teach gastroenterology content. Results. A curriculum map of gastroenterology topics was constructed from 10 of the medical schools that responded. Topics often not taught included pediatric GI diseases, surgery and trauma, food allergies/intolerances, and obesity. Gastroenterology was taught primarily by gastroenterologists and surgeons. Didactic and small group teaching was the most employed teaching method. Conclusion. This study is the first step in examining the Canadian gastroenterology curriculum at a preclinical level. The data can be used to inform curriculum development so that topics generally lacking are better incorporated in the curriculum. The study can also be used as a guide for further curriculum design and alignment across the country.