Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume 2018, Article ID 6075207, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6075207
Research Article

Excessive Pretreatment Weight Loss Is a Risk Factor for the Survival Outcome of Esophageal Carcinoma Patients Undergoing Radical Surgery and Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy

1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
2Department of Radiation Oncology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
3Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Shou-Min Bai; nc.ude.usys.liam@mhsiab

Received 25 September 2017; Accepted 4 January 2018; Published 28 January 2018

Academic Editor: Yousuke Nakai

Copyright © 2018 Xiao-Li Yu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The prognostic values of weight loss and body mass index (BMI) in esophageal carcinoma remain controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of weight loss on the survival of patients undergoing radical surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods. The medical records of 189 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic esophageal carcinoma treated in our hospital between January 2012 and December 2013 were reviewed, and 121 patients were included for analysis. Results. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the 3-year overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low pretreatment weight loss (pre-LWL) group than in the high pretreatment weight loss (pre-HWL) group (). In addition, the 3-year overall survival rate of normal weight group was higher than that of overweight and underweight groups (). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that pre-LWL group had a significantly better 3-year overall survival than pre-HWL group (, HR = 1.89, and 95% CI = 1.07–3.32). pN stage and age were also the survival prognostic factors. Conclusions. Our study showed that low pretreatment weight loss predicted a better survival outcome in the esophageal carcinoma patients with radical surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. However, BMI and weight loss during treatment had no impact on the survival outcome.