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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume 2018, Article ID 6240467, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6240467
Review Article

Combination Immunotherapy Approaches for Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory of Pharmacology for Natural Products, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, China
2The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yunqi Zhao; moc.361@qyz_eolhc

Received 6 November 2017; Accepted 24 December 2017; Published 7 March 2018

Academic Editor: Qi Chen

Copyright © 2018 Xianliang Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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