Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology

Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology / 1996 / Article

Original Article | Open Access

Volume 7 |Article ID 950391 | https://doi.org/10.1155/1996/950391

Canadian Itraconazole Study Group, Thomas W Austin, Marc Steben, Marion Powell, Barbara Romanowski, David W Megran, Gary E Garber, Lynette J Margesson, "Short-Course Itraconazole in the Treatment of Candida Vulvovaginitis: A Multicentre Canadian Study", Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, vol. 7, Article ID 950391, 5 pages, 1996. https://doi.org/10.1155/1996/950391

Short-Course Itraconazole in the Treatment of Candida Vulvovaginitis: A Multicentre Canadian Study

Received26 Apr 1995
Accepted02 Nov 1995

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical and mycological effectiveness of oral itraconazole in the treatment of acute candida vulvovaginitis.DESIGN: A prospective, randomized and single-blinded, multicentre trial of 221 women, comparing a one-day course of oral itraconazole 200 mg bid with vaginal clotrimazole 500 mg single-dose therapy.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms, signs and mycological results were assessed up to two months following treatment. Adverse events were recorded and evidence of hepatotoxicity sought.RESULTS: At 10 and 30 days post-treatment, clinical and mycological cure rates were similar (61.3% clinical and 88.6% mycological 10 days after, and 67.7% clinical and 79.5 mycological 30 days after itraconazole; 64.0 clinical and 85.9% mycological 10 days after, and 62.1% clinical and 78.6 mycological 30 days after clotrimazole) with the majority of both treatment groups free from infection. A total of 69 patients reported adverse events, which were generally transient and mild. Itraconazole was more often associated with gastrointestinal or central nervous system complaints, while clotrimazole recipients more often had genitourinary symptoms. No evidence of hepatotoxicity was found. A higher incidence of relapse was noted among women on the birth control pill and among those who were symptomatic for longer than 10 days before treatment.CONCLUSIONS: A one-day course of oral itraconazole is as effective as intravaginal clotrimazole in the treatment of acute yeast vulvovaginitis. The number of patients reporting adverse events was similar for the treatment groups, although the side effect profile differed. No hepatotoxicity was observed.

Copyright © 1996 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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