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Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1324310, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1324310
Review Article

Evidences of the Low Implication of Mosquitoes in the Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the Causative Agent of Buruli Ulcer

1AgroEcoHealth Platform, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), 08 P.O. Box 0932, Tri-Postal, Cotonou, Benin
2Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon
3Department of Technics and Technology, Platform of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute Abidjan, P.O. Box 490 Abidjan 01, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
4Faculty of Science and Techniques, University of Abomey-Calavi, P.O. Box 526, Abomey-Calavi, Benin
5Department of Bacteriology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, P.O. Box 581, Legon, Accra, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Francis Zeukeng; moc.oohay@70kcnarfsuez

Received 13 May 2017; Revised 8 July 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 28 August 2017

Academic Editor: Maria De Francesco

Copyright © 2017 Rousseau Djouaka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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