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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2017, Article ID 4896310, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4896310
Research Article

Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography of Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Tumor Metabolism

1Molecular Imaging Branch, Division of Convergence Technology, National Cancer Center, Ilsanro-ro 323, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 10408, Republic of Korea
2Animal Molecular Imaging Unit, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsanro-ro 323, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 10408, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Daehong Kim; rk.er.ccn@mikd

Received 22 July 2017; Revised 31 October 2017; Accepted 14 November 2017; Published 5 December 2017

Academic Editor: Sundaresan Gobalakrishnan

Copyright © 2017 Soo Hyun Shin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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