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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2018, Article ID 6268437, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6268437
Research Article

Neural Induction Potential and MRI of ADSCs Labeled Cationic Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle In Vitro

1Medical Imaging Department, Nan Sha Center Hospital, Guangzhou Municipal First People’s Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, The Second Affiliated Hospital of South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 511457, China
2Department of Radiology, Huizhou Municipal Central Hospital, Huizhou, Guangdong 516001, China
3School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004, China
4Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, 3990 John R. Street, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Qi Xie; ten.haey@8iqeix and Baolin Zhang; moc.liamy@gnahzniloab

Received 24 August 2017; Revised 21 December 2017; Accepted 31 December 2017; Published 14 February 2018

Academic Editor: Maria P. Morales

Copyright © 2018 Weiqiong Ma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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