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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2018, Article ID 8194678, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8194678
Clinical Study

Comparing the Differential Diagnostic Values of 18F-Alfatide II PET/CT between Tuberculosis and Lung Cancer Patients

1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangnan University (Wuxi No. 4 People’s Hospital), Wuxi, China
2Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Chunjing Yu; moc.361@8791dxw_jcy

Received 31 October 2017; Revised 27 December 2017; Accepted 31 December 2017; Published 19 February 2018

Academic Editor: Yuebing Wang

Copyright © 2018 Xiaoqing Du et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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