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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 140513, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/140513
Research Article

Measuring Connectivity in Linear Multivariate Processes: Definitions, Interpretation, and Practical Analysis

Laboratorio Biosegnali, Dipartimento di Fisica & BIOtech, Università di Trento, via delle Regole 101, 38123 Mattarello, Trento, Italy

Received 28 October 2011; Revised 22 February 2012; Accepted 3 March 2012

Academic Editor: Dimitris Kugiumtzis

Copyright © 2012 Luca Faes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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