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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 645732, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/645732
Research Article

A Patient-Specific Airway Branching Model for Mechanically Ventilated Patients

1University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
2University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Received 14 March 2014; Revised 30 July 2014; Accepted 31 July 2014; Published 20 August 2014

Academic Editor: Guang Wu

Copyright © 2014 Nor Salwa Damanhuri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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