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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 785752, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/785752
Research Article

Computational Modeling of Interventions and Protective Thresholds to Prevent Disease Transmission in Deploying Populations

1MathEcology, Phoenix, AZ 85086, USA
2piTree Software, Metuchen, NJ 08840, USA
3Military Vaccine Agency (MILVAX), Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 5 May 2014; Accepted 7 May 2014; Published 9 June 2014

Academic Editor: Thierry Busso

Copyright © 2014 Colleen Burgess et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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