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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 864979, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/864979
Research Article

Altered Intrinsic Connectivity Networks in Frontal Lobe Epilepsy: A Resting-State fMRI Study

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
2Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002, China
3Department of Radiotherapy, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002, China

Received 21 July 2014; Revised 12 October 2014; Accepted 2 November 2014; Published 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Valeri Makarov

Copyright © 2014 Xinzhi Cao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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