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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 952381, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/952381
Research Article

Conflicts of Interest during Contact Investigations: A Game-Theoretic Analysis

1Francis I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0412, San Francisco, CA 94143-0412, USA
2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0412, San Francisco, CA 94143-0412, USA
3Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0412, San Francisco, CA 94143-0412, USA

Received 22 November 2013; Revised 4 February 2014; Accepted 6 March 2014; Published 14 April 2014

Academic Editor: Chris Bauch

Copyright © 2014 Nicolas Sippl-Swezey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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