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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 407156, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/407156
Research Article

Parametric Modeling of Human Gradient Walking for Predicting Minimum Energy Expenditure

Departament de Biologia Animal, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Received 17 December 2014; Revised 2 February 2015; Accepted 3 February 2015

Academic Editor: Zhonghua Sun

Copyright © 2015 Gerard Saborit and Adrià Casinos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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