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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 862942, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/862942
Review Article

Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

1Applied Technology for Neuro-Psychology Lab, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, 20145 Milan, Italy
2Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, 20123 Milan, Italy

Received 12 December 2014; Accepted 3 February 2015

Academic Editor: Yuri Ostrovsky

Copyright © 2015 Irene Alice Chicchi Giglioli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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