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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 893507, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/893507
Research Article

Unified Modeling of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndromes

1Computational and Quantitative Biology Lab, Koc University, 34450 Istanbul, Turkey
2Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34093 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 18 September 2014; Accepted 24 November 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Camastra

Copyright © 2015 Yasemin Bozkurt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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