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Complexity
Volume 2018, Article ID 1613402, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1613402
Research Article

Effects of HD-tDCS on Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: An fNIRS Study

1School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Republic of Korea
2Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Keum-Shik Hong; rk.ca.nasup@gnohsk

Received 4 June 2018; Revised 31 August 2018; Accepted 17 September 2018; Published 1 November 2018

Academic Editor: Vincent Labatut

Copyright © 2018 M. Atif Yaqub et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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