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Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5238028, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5238028
Research Article

A Pervasive Approach to EEG-Based Depression Detection

1Gansu Provincial Key Laboratory of Wearable Computing, School of Information Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
2CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China
3Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
4Department of Child Psychology, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou, China
5Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
6The Third People’s Hospital of Tianshui City, Tianshui, China
7Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
8Computer Systems Institute, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Bin Hu; nc.ude.uzl@hb

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 17 November 2017; Accepted 4 January 2018; Published 6 February 2018

Academic Editor: Haiying Wang

Copyright © 2018 Hanshu Cai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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