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Volume 2019, Article ID 4895891, 39 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4895891
Research Article

The Discriminative Lexicon: A Unified Computational Model for the Lexicon and Lexical Processing in Comprehension and Production Grounded Not in (De)Composition but in Linear Discriminative Learning

1Seminar für Sprachwissenschaft, Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen, Wilhelmstrasse 19, 72074 Tübingen, Germany
2Homerton College, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 8PH, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to R. Harald Baayen; moc.liamg@neyaab.dlarah

Received 1 June 2018; Accepted 14 November 2018; Published 1 January 2019

Guest Editor: Dirk Wulff

Copyright © 2019 R. Harald Baayen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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