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Case Reports in Anesthesiology
Volume 2013, Article ID 213472, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/213472
Case Report

Myoclonus following a Peripheral Nerve Block

1Department of Anesthesiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Drive, San Antonio, TX 78234m, USA

Received 10 May 2013; Accepted 18 June 2013

Academic Editors: S. Bele, I.-O. Lee, R. Riley, and C. Seefelder

Copyright © 2013 Arlene J. Hudson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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