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Case Reports in Cardiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6218723, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6218723
Case Report

Solid Right Ventricular Compression by Intraventricular Septum-Hematoma Induced after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

1First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim (UMM), Faculty of Medicine Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany
2German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany
3Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim (UMM), Faculty of Medicine Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany

Received 11 October 2015; Accepted 18 February 2016

Academic Editor: Yoshiro Naito

Copyright © 2016 Ibrahim El-Battrawy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Intraventricular septum-hematoma is a rare complication following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This complication may represent a challenge for accurate diagnosis and treatment. This case report is about a 60-year-old male patient being admitted with an acute coronary syndrome. Despite successful PCI with drug eluting stent implantation into the right coronary artery (RCA) the patient complained about recurrent angina pectoris according to Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) class IV. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography revealed a massive  cm sized end-diastolic septum-hematoma, which compromised right ventricular cavity. Emergent recoronary angiography ruled out further contrast extravasation from the RCA. Conservative treatment was intended after discussion in the “heart-team.” The patient completely recovered with nearly complete resolution of the hematoma after 6 months.