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Case Reports in Cardiology
Volume 2017, Article ID 4061205, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4061205
Case Report

ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Normal Coronary Arteries after Consuming Energy Drinks

1Division of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare, La Crosse, WI, USA
2Division of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to S. Michael Gharacholou; ude.oyam@rayhahs.uolohcarahg

Received 21 November 2016; Accepted 21 December 2016; Published 19 January 2017

Academic Editor: Antonio de Padua Mansur

Copyright © 2017 S. Michael Gharacholou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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