Case Reports in Dentistry
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision65 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore0.490
Impact Factor-
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Multidisciplinary Oral Rehabilitation of a Severely Compromised Dentition

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Case Reports in Dentistry publishes case reports and case series in all areas of dentistry, including periodontal diseases, dental implants, oral pathology, as well as oral and maxillofacial surgery.

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Case Reports in Dentistry maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Two Cases of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Comprising Partial Autoamputation of the Apex of the Tongue

The prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adults is lower than that in adolescents and it is more prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. Sleep disturbances such as nightmares are associated with NSSI after accounting for depression; thus, persons with major NSSI sometimes present at medical institutions during the night seeking emergency treatment. Gingival tissues comprise the most frequent target of self-injury of the oral cavity using oral hygiene tools. Most NSSI in the oral cavity is minor because such tools are blunt. Major NSSI such as autoamputation of the tongue is rare. We describe two patients who partially autoamputated the apex of their own tongues using edged tools. Case 1 was a 55-year-old female with depression who had defaulted from psychiatric intervention. She had cut off her tongue using a Japanese kitchen knife and presented with the dry, necrotic amputated portion and blood oozing from the remainder of her tongue. We debrided and sutured the remainder of the tongue without reattaching the amputated portion. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she was free of adverse events such as functional disability and wound infection. Case 2 was a 69-year-old female with schizophrenia who had defaulted from psychiatric intervention and had cut off her tongue using scissors. The amputated portion of the tongue was lost and the remainder, which was oozing blood, was debrided and sutured. She defaulted on a follow-up appointment. Neither of these patients had suicidal intent. The prevalence of NSSI across all age groups has recently increased, and the risk that self-injury will become normalized has become a concern. Thus, dentists as well as oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of the possibility that patients will present with major NSSI requiring emergency treatment.

Case Report

Successful Management of Ludwig’s Angina due to Dental Implant Displacement: A Rare Case Report

Dental implant surgery is a common procedure in oral and maxillofacial surgery practices. Extensive training, skill, and experience allow this procedure to be performed with an atraumatic approach, but like any surgical technique, it is subject to accidents and complications. This is an unusual clinical case of an accidental displacement of an implant into the submandibular space that progressed to Ludwig’s angina, and it has not yet been described in the literature. This case report describes a clinical case of dental implant displaced into the submandibular space after healing cap removal. After seven days, it progressed to Ludwig’s angina. The removal was performed through extraoral access in the submandibular area by using hemostatic forceps and radioscopic technique. After implant removal, the clinical case showed a satisfactory repair emphasizing the importance of a meticulous clinical planning to achieve an appropriate treatment plan, which is essential for a favorable prognosis. Therefore, prevention and management of displaced objects requires proper planning and surgical technique.

Case Report

An Uncommon Case of Plasma Cell Mucositis of the Tongue in a Young Man

Plasma cell mucositis (PCM) is an unusual plasma cell proliferative disorder of the upper aerodigestive tract. It is a rare disease, and its etiology is not yet known with variable clinical features. Symptoms include dysphagia, oral pain, and swelling. We described a case of PCM involving the tongue of a 14-year-old man. In the first place, several diagnostic hypotheses were proposed, most of them discarded for incompatibility with blood and laboratory tests. This disease rarely manifests itself on the tongue, especially in young patients with no comorbidities. The management of PCM is mainly aimed at reducing the symptoms, and in our report, the treatment involved the use of systemic prednisone with an improvement of the quality of life. At 1-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the disease. Many therapeutic treatments are able to stabilize but not able to induce a complete remission. PCM is considered an uncommon benign disorder with a favorable prognosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis with other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions.

Case Report

Acemannan Induced Bone Regeneration in Lateral Sinus Augmentation Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomographic and Histopathological Evaluation

Acemannan, the major polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, is biomaterial that has demonstrated osteoinductive effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of acemannan sponges on bone formation in open-type sinus augmentation has not evaluated. Here, we report a case study using radiographic and histological analyses to investigate the effect of acemannan on bone formation after lateral sinus lift surgery. The case was a 57-year-old female patient with an atrophic left posterior maxilla who underwent lateral sinus lift using an acemannan sponge using the two-stage procedure. In the first stage, an acemannan sponge was inserted through the bony window and placed between the antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were taken immediately as baseline and 6-month postoperation for evaluation. A bone core specimen was also obtained for histological examination at the time of implant placement. The histological results revealed new bone formation, and the CBCT images demonstrated increased alveolar bone height at 6-month postoperation. Our findings suggest that an acemannan sponge could be a biomaterial for inducing bone formation in sinus lift surgery.

Case Report

A Clinicopathological Report of Four Cases of Squamous Odontogenic Tumor-Like Proliferations in Odontogenic Cysts: Suggested Opinions regarding This Unusual Nature

Distinguishing squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations (SOTLPs) is important in odontogenic cysts to avoid misinterpretation such as a squamous odontogenic tumor, well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, and acanthomatous type of ameloblastoma. This study is aimed at reporting 4 cases of these clinicopathological proliferations in order to shed more light on the importance of distinguishing them from other similar types. 150 odontogenic cysts were studied in which four cases (2.66%) with SOTLPs were identified including 2 radicular cysts, 1 dentigerous cyst, and 1 odontogenic keratocyst. These proliferations were observed in the cysts’ wall particularly adjacent to the epithelial lining. All cysts had inflammation while 3 cases showed budding from the epithelial cyst lining. The findings suggested that lining of odontogenic cysts could be a source of SOTLPs, and inflammation probably played an effective role in their development. Its incidence was 2.66% in the present study. Although SOTLPs are not frequent in odontogenic cysts, their identification is important to prevent wrong histopathologic interpretation and treatment.

Case Report

A Retrospective Case Report on the Longevity of a Reimplanted Closed-Apex Avulsed Canine

For an avulsed tooth with closed apices, it is recommended that the tooth undergoes elective root canal treatment. We however present in this case report a 73-year-old Afro-Caribbean lady, with an asymptomatic, untreated, self-replanted lower left canine which suffered an avulsion 45 years ago. The patient reported no loss of function. This case illustrates the potentially positive outcome of a replanted, non-root-treated, avulsed closed-apex tooth while highlighting the significance of patient-related factors.

Case Reports in Dentistry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision65 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore0.490
Impact Factor-
 Submit