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Case Reports in Dentistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 168232, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/168232
Case Report

Apicotomy as Treatment for Failure of Orthodontic Traction

1Stomatology Department, Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97015-370 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
2Department of Orthodontics, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Stomatology Department, Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97015-370 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
4Stomatology Department, Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97015-370 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
5Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Franciscan University Center, 97015-370 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

Received 5 August 2013; Accepted 7 October 2013

Academic Editors: J. H. Campbell, C. Evans, A. Y. Gamal, and A. Milosevic

Copyright © 2013 Leandro Berni Osório et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to present a case report that demonstrated primary failure in a tooth traction that was subsequently treated with apicotomy technique. Case Report. A 10-year-old girl had an impacted upper right canine with increased pericoronal space, which was apparent on a radiographic image. The right maxillary sinus showed an opacity suggesting sinusitis. The presumptive diagnosis was dentigerous cyst associated with maxillary sinus infection. The plan for treatment included treatment of the sinus infection and cystic lesion and orthodontic traction of the canine after surgical exposure and bonding of an orthodontic appliance. The surgical procedure, canine position, root dilaceration, and probably apical ankylosis acted in the primary failure of the orthodontic traction. Surgical apical cut of the displaced teeth was performed, and tooth position in the dental arch was possible, with a positive response to the pulp vitality test. Conclusion. Apicotomy is an effective technique to treat severe canine displacement and primary orthodontic traction failure of palatally displaced canines.