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Case Reports in Dentistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 1965078, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1965078
Case Report

Histological Evaluation and Management of Rare Case of Supernumerary “Ghost” Teeth

1University Department, Istituto Stomatologico Italiano and Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
2Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
3Istituto Stomatologico Italiano, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Corinne Poli; moc.liamg@1ilop.enniroc

Received 22 February 2017; Accepted 10 April 2017; Published 4 May 2017

Academic Editor: Gerardo Gómez-Moreno

Copyright © 2017 Dino Re et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Supernumerary teeth are teeth that exceed the normal dental formula. Their prevalence in the permanent dentition is 1–14% and they occur more frequently in maxilla with a sex ratio of 2 : 1 in favor of males. They are often associated with syndromes but there are examples of nonsyndromic multiple supernumerary teeth reported in the literature. CBCT is usually the best exam for radiographic diagnosis and treatment planning, because it provides 3D information about location and morphology of supernumerary teeth. This paper reports a rare case of four supernumerary teeth in a nonsyndromic 9-year-old boy. The peculiarity of this case is that two more exceeding teeth were found during surgical procedure. After extraction, all the teeth underwent a histological undecalcified processing for light microscopical examination. The two “ghost” supernumerary teeth seemed to be primordial dental germs, possibly resulting from an altered odontogenic process. After supernumerary teeth extraction, X-rays and exfoliation monitoring are recommended, since permanent retained teeth often erupt naturally or, at least, improve their condition. Radiographic follow-up is also useful in order to assess the formation of further teeth due to the hyperactivity of the dental lamina.