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Case Reports in Dentistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 2106245, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2106245
Case Report

Ten-Year Follow-Up of a Fragment Reattachment to an Anterior Tooth: A Conservative Approach

1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Federal Fluminense University, Health Institute of Nova Friburgo, School of Dentistry, Rua Doutor Silvio Henrique Braune 22, 28625-650 Nova Friburgo, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Restorative Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, School of Dentistry, Rua Israel Pinheiro 2000, Bloco D9, Bairro Universitário, 35020-220 Governador Valadares, MG, Brazil
3Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Federal Fluminense University, Health Institute of Nova Friburgo, School of Dentistry, Rua Doutor Silvio Henrique Braune 22, 28625-650 Nova Friburgo, RJ, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Leandro Passos; rb.ffu.di@sossapordnael

Received 21 March 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: H. Cem Güngör

Copyright © 2017 Luiz Mendes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This report describes the 10-year follow-up data of a patient who underwent fragment reattachment to the maxillary central incisor after coronal fracture with pulp exposure as well as the procedures followed for functional and esthetic adjustments. A 9-year-old female patient presented at the clinic of dentistry at the State University of Rio de Janeiro with a coronal fracture and pulp exposure of the right maxillary central incisor that had occurred immediately after an accident. The intact tooth fragment was recovered at the accident site and stored in milk. The treatment plan followed was to perform direct pulp capping and tooth fragment reattachment. When the patient was 14 years old, adhesion between fragment and remaining tooth was lost, and fragment reattachment was performed. Five years later, the same tooth presented clinical discoloration and absence of sensitivity during pulp vitality tests. Subsequently, a new treatment plan was formulated, which included endodontic treatment, followed by nonvital tooth bleaching and light-cured composite resin restoration. An esthetic and natural-looking restoration was achieved. Tooth fragment reattachment is not a temporary restorative technique and requires functional and esthetic adjustments over time to maintain the biomimetic characteristics of traumatized anterior teeth and predictable outcomes.