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Case Reports in Dentistry
Volume 2018, Article ID 7586468, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7586468
Case Report

Infant Oral Mutilation

1University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
3Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Private Practice of Pediatric Dentistry, Raleigh, NC, USA
4Private Practice of Pediatric Dentistry, Raleigh, NC, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Emily A. Pope; moc.liamg@1epopaylime

Received 26 June 2017; Accepted 8 January 2018; Published 21 February 2018

Academic Editor: Daniel Torrés-Lagares

Copyright © 2018 Emily A. Pope et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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