Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
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Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision72 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
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A Case of Terbinafine-Resistant Tinea Cruris Caused by Trichophyton tonsurans

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Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine publishes case reports and case series covering prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the skin, hair, and nails.

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Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

A Case Report of Improved Palmoplantar Pustulosis following Periodontal Treatment and Possible Association with Diminished Systemic Subclinical Inflammation

Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) is a recurrent pustular dermatosis located on the palms and soles. Focal infection may exacerbate the symptoms of PPP, but the etiology is not fully clear. A 56-year-old woman with PPP was diagnosed with severe chronic periodontitis. Initial treatment for periodontitis combined with topical application of antibiotics and surgical treatment was performed. In this case, attention was paid to the relevance of systemic inflammation caused by periodontitis with the clinical symptoms of PPP. With periodontal treatment, the symptoms of PPP and periodontitis, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level, and periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) improved. This case highlights the importance of comprehensive dental examinations, including those for oral infections, such as periodontitis and other unrecognized sources of infection, and dental treatment in the overall management of PPP.

Case Report

Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis Refractory to First-Line Treatment

Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection endemic in Latin America and has been attributed to the thermodimorphic fungus of the genus Sporothrix. Transmission to humans occurs during a traumatic injury with soil or organic material; additionally, lesions caused by infected cats play an important role in the epidemiology of the disease. The classic treatment of sporotrichosis is performed with itraconazole or potassium iodide; second-line medications, such as amphotericin B and terbinafine, can alternatively be used in cases of first-line drug failure. In the present study, a patient with lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis in the right upper limb exhibited intolerance to itraconazole and potassium iodide, additionally during the period of use; these drugs did not control skin lesions. In this patient, amphotericin B deoxycholate and its liposomal version were used in this patient; and complete recovery of the lesions was observed.

Case Report

A Guttate Psoriasis That Tends to Spare Three Tattoos: A Macrophage Liaison

Induction of new psoriasis sites was reported in only a small amount of psoriasis patients undergoing tattooing, despite the intuitive belief that tattoo trauma might awaken the disease due to the isomorphic phenomenon of Koebner. In this case report, we discuss a patient who presented with a remarkable sparing of his three tattoo sites during a guttate psoriasis flare-up that was unrelated to tattooing. The spatial concordance of tattoo and psoriasis lesions was analyzed on clinical pictures of tattoo sites taken during the psoriasis episode. For the quantification of the spatial distribution of the psoriasis lesions, Voronoi diagrams were generated, and coefficients of variation and the two-sample t-test were employed to compare the distributions of Voronoi patch sizes in different settings. Compared to skin areas without tattoos, a tattoo introduced a higher variation in the sizes of the Voronoi patches centered around psoriasis lesions. Based on our findings, we would like to discuss the possible role of macrophages as the key cellular link in the complex pathophysiologic relationship between tattooing/tattoo and psoriasis. Taking into account the relationship of autophagy and psoriasis lesions, we propose the hypothesis that tattoos represent a “psoriasis-hostile” tissue environment pertained by a population of LAP active M2-polarized macrophages. Further clinical studies of the relationship of psoriasis lesions to the tattooed skin are needed and may provide important insights into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

Case Report

Brooke–Spiegler Syndrome: Familial Cylindromatosis, a Rare Variant of a Rare Familial Syndrome

Brooke–Spiegler Syndrome (BSS) is a rare autosomal dominant familial disorder resulting in dermatologic neoplasms of copious nodular appendages. Here, we report a case of Familial Cylindromatosis (FC), a subtype of BSS, in a patient with the largest cylindroma of 7.4 × 5.6 × 3.8 cm on the scalp. The patient had undiagnosed cylindromas growing for 36 years at presentation; however, he did not seek out healthcare evaluation. Excision and pathologic investigation of three large masses from different body sites determined a shared phenotype of cylindromas. Subsequent evaluation of the patient's son separately, after primary patient excision, confirmed cylindroma development as well. The pathologic evidence of cylindromas in the patient with a new history of family incidence confirmed the diagnosis of the FC variant of BSS.

Case Report

Erythema Multiforme Induced by a “Milker’s Nodule” Pseudocowpox Infection: A Case Report and Review of Literature

Milker’s nodule is caused by the pseudocowpox virus following inoculation from infected cattle. We report the case of erythema multiforme induced by pseudocowpox infection in an 18-year-old female from regional Australia. While erythema multiforme has been described as a complication of orf, it is rare as a sequela of pseudocowpox infection. Greater clinical knowledge of this disease and potential complications aid in guiding appropriate management of this phenomenon.

Case Report

Oral Isotretinoin Therapy in Recalcitrant Molluscum Contagiosum in an Immunocompromised Patient

Molluscum contagiosum is a viral infection caused by the Poxvirus characterized by multiple umbilicated papules. It is common in children and can be present at any body site. Severe molluscum is common in immunocompromised patients. We report a 20-year-old HIV-positive individual with widespread molluscum contagiosum, recalcitrant to topical therapy, under antiretroviral therapy, who was treated with oral isotretinoin and had a dramatic outcome. Although studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of oral isotretinoin therapy in molluscum contagiosum, its easy availability, cost, and excellent safety profile appear to offer a promising therapeutic option.

Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision72 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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