Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision72 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Carbamazepine-Induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Managed by Mobile Teledermatology in COVID-19 Pandemic in Rural Nepal

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Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine publishes case reports and case series covering prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the skin, hair, and nails.

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Case Report

Dercum’s Disease: A Case Report of a Patient Having Both Type 1 and Type 2 Dercum’s Disease

Dercum’s disease, or adiposis dolorosa, is a rare disorder which consists of multiple, painful lipomas within the subcutaneous tissue and has a distribution mainly in the abdomen and extremities. Dercum’s disease can be defined as in combination with chronic painful adipose tissue. Although the etiology of Dercum’s disease is not clear, it is thought to be a combination of a neurological and endocrine disorder. Treatment for this disease is centered at managing pain. Although there is no standard of care for managing pain, there are different pain management regimes that are promising.

Case Report

Aeromonas hydrophila Survives the Treatment of Posttraumatic Cellulitis in the Shelter of an Obscured Fish-Bone Fragment

Fish bone and/or spine puncture injuries can result in infection of the upper extremities with aquatic bacterial pathogens. Additionally, in such injuries, the inoculation of foreign organic material is frequent and may further complicate the clinical presentation and course of the resulting infection. We describe the case of a 45-year-old female patient with a minimal fish rostrum puncture trauma acquired during preparation of fresh fish meal, which resulted in a galloping hand cellulitis. The alarming clinical presentation and the prompt response of the skin infection to clindamycin obscured the presence of inoculated fish rostrum remnants in the tissue that, three weeks later, gave rise to a foreign body granuloma, from which Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated. Final resolution was achieved with an additional two-week doxycycline treatment. In conclusion, the reported case highlights the potential of the accidentally implanted organic material, as are fish bones, not only to transfer uncommon pathogens but also to offer a sanctuary that favors microbial survival despite antibiotic therapy thus enabling latent or recurrent infections.

Case Report

Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as Multiple Immune-Related Adverse Events

Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma with a high rate of regional and distant metastasis and mortality. Here, we report a novel case of Merkel cell carcinoma which presented as a primary lesion to the left cheek with regional lymph node involvement and was treated with pembrolizumab and radiation. Widely metastatic disease eventually revealed on autopsy clinically mimicked immune-related organ insult leading to management with immunosuppressants. The patient also had a biopsy-confirmed immune-related cutaneous adverse event during admission. The case highlights a rare circumstance in which disease progression masqueraded as multiple immune-related end-organ adverse events. Contribution of on-target anti-PD-1 toxicity remains a possibility.

Case Report

Surgery of Kerion, a Nightmare for Nondermatologists

Kerion is an inflammatory type of tinea capitis characterized by swelling and alopecia of the scalp, which could be mistaken as bacterial infection. It occurs most frequently in children. We report a 10-year-old child whose kerion was misdiagnosed as bacterial abscess and unnecessarily incised. Later, her condition was rediagnosed as kerion based on clinical appearance and potassium hydroxide wet mount. The lesions resolved completely with systemic antifungal treatment, griseofulvin, leaving residual scarring alopecia. The delay in the proper diagnosis and inappropriate treatment of this patient resulted in permanent scarring alopecia. Thus, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion for tinea capitis when dealing with inflammatory scalp lesions.

Case Report

The Management of Erythrodermic Psoriasis Complicated by Cyclosporine

We present a 64-year-old woman with past medical history of psoriasis and alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with a diffuse, erythematous, and scaly rash. Pertinent medications included topical triamcinolone 0.1% cream. She was started on oral prednisone 40 milligrams (mg) and oral cyclosporine 150 mg daily and was continued on topical triamcinolone. After the administration of two doses of this regimen, the serum creatinine increased to 1.76 mg/dL, and serum potassium increased to 6.7 mEq/L. The serum creatinine continued to uptrend to 2.42 mg/dL, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased to 20 mL/min. The patient was emergently hemodialyzed. The patient was placed on an extended steroid taper, alleviating the psoriatic rash. However, the patient needed to be placed on a steroid-sparing regimen. Because of its rarity and ensuing complications, erythrodermic psoriasis must be identified and managed promptly. Cyclosporine is currently the first-line treatment. However, initiation of this therapy in our patient resulted in an acute kidney injury (AKI). Even though a steroid taper assisted in alleviating erythroderma, a steroid-sparing regimen needed to be started. This led to the consideration of alternate methods of therapy for further management of erythrodermic psoriasis with renal impairment.

Case Report

Oral White Sponge Nevus: An Exceptional Differential Diagnosis in Childhood

White sponge nevus is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by white, irregular, diffuse plaques mainly affecting the oral mucosa. Histological findings of white sponge nevus are characteristic but not pathognomonic. We report a case of an oral white sponge nevus in a 6-year-old girl, which poses a problem in differential diagnosis with oral candidiasis. No treatment was performed because of the benign and asymptomatic nature of the lesions.

Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision72 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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