Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision124 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore0.900
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Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Penis: A Rare, Dangerous Clinical Entity and the Importance of Immunohistochemistry in Diagnosis

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Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine publishes case reports and case series covering prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the skin, hair, and nails.

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Case Report

Granulosis Rubra Nasi: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

Granulosis rubra nasi is a rare autosomal dominant disease of the eccrine glands. It is clinically characterized by mid-face hyperhidrosis, most prominent at the tip of the nose, and dark erythematous papules on the nose, cheeks, chin, and upper lip. Although it commonly occurs in childhood, it can also occur in adults. This is a case report of two female granulosis rubra nasi patients. This report, to the best of my knowledge, has not before been described in Ethiopian individuals and is hence being reported due to its rarity.

Case Report

Systemic Sarcoidosis Presenting in a Scar

While most forms of sarcoidosis of the skin do not require treatment, 40% of patients initially diagnosed with cutaneous sarcoidosis are found to have an asymptomatic disease involving other organ systems. It is the involvement of the lungs, heart, eyes, and nervous system which most often contributes to morbidity/mortality. An early and accurate diagnosis of sarcoidosis is difficult because patients may be asymptomatic, initial presentations may vary, and there is no single reliable diagnostic test except biopsy. We present a case of scar sarcoidosis which led to the diagnosis of stage II pulmonary sarcoidosis in a woman in her 50s. Her scar sarcoidosis presented as well-circumscribed, reddish-brown macules surrounding an atrophic scar from a prior skin graft on the right leg. Biopsy revealed scattered, well-formed, non-necrotizing granulomas of the dermis composed of epithelioid histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, surrounded by a sparse infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes. A CT chest demonstrated extensive hilar lymphadenopathy, leading to a diagnosis of stage II pulmonary sarcoidosis with cutaneous involvement. This case illustrates the interesting presentation of scar sarcoidosis and underscores the importance of a broad differential including sarcoidosis for skin changes around scars and underscores the need for early biopsy. Prompt cutaneous diagnosis leads to earlier systemic evaluation, therapeutics, and better outcomes.

Case Report

Multiple Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Patient Using Skin Bleaching Products in Togo

Background. The cosmetic use of skin bleaching products is common among women in sub-Saharan Africa despite numerous reported cutaneous and systemic complications. We report the first case of squamous cell carcinoma in a woman using skin bleaching products in Togo. Case Report. A 65-year-old woman with a 30-year history of skin bleaching products use consulted in dermatology for a tumor of the neck that had been evolving for 2 years. There was no personal or family history of cancer. The patient was obese (BMI = 38.3 kg/m2) and had high blood pressure. Clinical examination noted multiple ulcerative and cauliflower tumors of the neck. The presence of stretch marks, skin atrophy, and ochronosis was noted in the examination of the rest of skin. There were no lymph nodes. HIV serology was negative. Histology of a tumor biopsy concluded to an invasive skin squamous cell carcinoma. The cervical, thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic TDM revealed pulmonary metastases. The patient underwent complete surgical removal of the right latero-cervical tumor. The left latero-cervical tumors were not removed because they infiltrated the large vessels. Chemotherapy before surgery was prescribed but not honored for financial reasons. The patient died 2 months after her first consultation in respiratory distress. Conclusion. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the complications of skin bleaching in sub-Saharan Africa. It is necessary to intensify awareness campaigns on the complications of this practice, in order to reduce their incidence, in our context where this practice is very frequent.

Case Report

Acquired Lymphangiectasia of the Scrotum Successfully Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation: A Case Report with Dermoscopic Review

Lymphangiectasia is dilatation of normal superficial lymphatic vessels due to damage or obstruction of deep lymphatic vessels leading to increased lymphatic pressure and engorgement of dermal lymphatics due to varying causes. Lymphangiectasia clinically presents as thick-walled, translucent vesicles and papules with chronic lymphedema rarely involving the scrotum. Here we report a patient with acquired lymphangiectasia of the scrotum secondary to surgery for hydrocele successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation. We highlight the use of dermoscopy as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in lymphangiectasia.

Case Report

A Rare Cutaneous Manifestation: Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccination

There is growing evidence that vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 can cause various skin reactions, many of which have autoimmune origins. These specific vaccine-induced autoimmune conditions with cutaneous manifestations include lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid, vitiligo, alopecia areata, and leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV). In particular, LCV, which is also called hypersensitivity vasculitis, is an inflammation of small blood vessels. We present a case of an 81-year-old male evaluated in the emergency department for a bilateral purpuric non-blanching rash that appeared ten days after receiving the Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. Results of a skin biopsy indicated LCV, and the rash completely resolved three weeks after clinical presentation.

Case Report

Psoriasiform Dermatitis in a COVID-19 Patient

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory papulosquamous disorder which affects around 2% of the world’s population. A peak exacerbation in psoriatic symptoms was noted during COVID-19 due to lack of access to dermatological care mixed with heightened emotional stress during the pandemic. This case report describes a 52-year-old admitted male patient who sustained a diffuse rash on multiple areas of his body a week prior to testing positive for COVID-19. We explore plausible causes for the occurrence of the rash, discuss our treatment plan, include relevant clinical pictures, and review published literature to examine conditions that present similarly to the rash seen in our patient. It is crucial for dermatologists to be able to discern various systemic manifestations associated with cutaneous lesions, such as the one seen in this patient, in order to make an accurate and prompt diagnosis. A better understanding of the association between COVID-19 infection and psoriasiform lesions is needed for improving the prognostic and therapeutic outcomes in patients.

Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision124 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore0.900
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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