Case Reports in Endocrinology
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Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision55 days
Acceptance to publication29 days
CiteScore0.800
Impact Factor-

Asymptomatic and Biochemically Silent Pheochromocytoma with Characteristic Findings on Imaging

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Case Reports in Endocrinology publishes case reports and case series related to the endocrine system and its associated diseases.

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Case Report

Apathetic Thyroid Storm with Cardiorespiratory Failure, Pulmonary Embolism, and Coagulopathy in a Young Male with Graves’ Disease and Myopathy

A 38-year-old gentleman presented with thyroid storm with multiorgan involvement in the form of heart failure (thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy), respiratory failure (respiratory muscle fatigue), hepatic dysfunction, fast atrial fibrillation, pulmonary embolism, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). His Graves’ disease (GD) remained undiagnosed for nearly 8 months because apart from weight loss, he has not had any other symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. The presentation of thyroid storm was atypical (apathetic thyroid storm) with features of depression and extreme lethargy without any fever, anxiety, agitation, or seizure. There were no identifiable triggers for the thyroid storm. Apart from mechanical ventilation and continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit, he received propylthiouracil (PTU), esmolol, and corticosteroids, which were later switched to carbimazole and propranolol with steroids being tapered down. He was diagnosed with thyrotoxic myopathy which, like GD, remained undiagnosed for long (fatigability). A high index of suspicion and a multidisciplinary care are essential for good outcome in these patients.

Case Report

Delayed Hypoparathyroidism following Thyroidectomy, a Diagnostic Conundrum: A Report of Three Cases from Sri Lanka

Introduction. Hypoparathyroidism, which is a common complication following total thyroidectomy can be transient in majority and permanent in 1.5% of the patients and usually occurs secondary to an inadvertent removal of parathyroid glands, mechanical or thermal injury or disruption of the vasculature. In some patients, it is observed that symptoms of hypocalcemia can occur for the first time several years after the surgery, which is known as “delayed hypoparathyroidism.” We report three cases of delayed hypoparathyroidism from Sri Lanka, presenting several years after total thyroidectomy. Case Presentation. Case 1- a 60-year-old Sri Lankan woman who presented with symptomatic hypocalcemia for the first time, 30 years after total thyroidectomy for follicular thyroid carcinoma. Case 2- a 53-year-old Sri Lankan woman presenting with neuropsychiatric manifestations of hypocalcemia for the first time, 12 years after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Case 3- a 49-year-old Sri Lankan woman developing symptoms of hypocalcemia for the first time, 11 years after completion of thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. All these patients were detected to have low parathyroid hormone levels, without an alternative etiology for hypoparathyroidism, hence leading to a diagnosis of delayed post-thyroidectomy hypoparathyroidism. Conclusion. Delayed hypoparathyroidism is a rare phenomenon, which is secondary to progressive atrophy of parathyroid glands and slowly progressive hypovascularization of parathyroids due to scar tissue retraction following thyroidectomy. The nonspecific nature of hypocalcemic symptoms and lack of continuous follow-up for a long time after thyroidectomy could contribute to a further delay in diagnosis. However, it is an important diagnosis to consider in any patient with a history of neck surgery presenting with hypocalcemia, irrespective of the time duration of surgery, as timely diagnosis and treatment can prevent long-term complications of hypocalcemia and improve the quality of life.

Case Report

Liquid Levothyroxine Formulation Taken during Lunch in Italy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Levothyroxine (L-T4) is among the most widely prescribed medications in the world, and it is considered by the World Health Organization an essential medicine for basic health care. Replacement therapy has always been considered straightforward although different factors may interfere with intestinal absorption of L-T4, including food, dietary fibre, coffee, drugs, and gastrointestinal diseases. For these reasons, current guidelines recommend that L-T4 should be taken in a fasting state because its absorption is maximised when it is taken on an empty stomach, reflecting the importance of gastric acidity in the absorption process. In addition to sodium L-T4 in tablet form, various formulations (soft-gel capsules and liquid solutions) have become available for clinical use in the last years promising improved absorption. We described a 31-year-old Italian man who took liquid levothyroxine formulation during lunch. He was under replacement therapy with liquid levothyroxine 75 mcg daily for hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto thyroiditis for three years. During confirmation of the L-T4 replacement therapy, the patient stated that he was going to continue to “take liquid levothyroxine during (his) lunch every day.” We recommended taking the medication correctly in the morning at least thirty minutes before breakfast and repeating TSH, fT4, and fT3 after three months. The thyroid hormonal profiles taken after 3 and 6 months were comparable to those when the patient was taking the medication during lunch. In conclusion, liquid levothyroxine formulation should be preferred in case of malabsorption or potential malabsorption. Liquid formulation should be preferred due to the possibility of taking it during breakfast, which significantly improves the compliance of patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the possibility of taking liquid L-T4 during lunch.

Case Report

ARMC5 Primary Bilateral Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia Associated with a Meningioma: A Family Report

Primary bilateral adrenal macronodular hyperplasia is characterized by functioning adrenal macronodules and variable cortisol secretion. Familial clustering suggests a genetic cause that has been confirmed with the identification of some genetic mutations, including inactivating germline mutations, in armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) gene. The identification of the pathogenic variant enables the physician to identify and treat these patients earlier and more effectively. It has also been noticed that patients with germline causative variants show a different clinical spectrum, presenting specific clinical characteristics, as the association with the presence of meningiomas.

Case Report

Development of Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in a Patient with DRESS Syndrome

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, is a serious, sometimes lethal, immunological reaction to drug metabolites involving multiple organ systems. Some of the common causative agents of DRESS include allopurinol, minocycline, sulfasalazine, azathioprine, antiepileptic drugs, and hydroxychloroquine. DRESS is often misdiagnosed and challenging to clinically manage due to the disease’s myriad presentations, acute complications, and long-term sequela after initial resolution. We present the case of a 39-year-old female patient that developed type 1 diabetes as a sequela of DRESS. The patient originally presented to the emergency department with three days of fevers and a pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash that began two weeks prior. She had recently started an antibiotic course and had also been on a long-term antiepileptic drug regimen. Following a thorough clinical examination, the patient was diagnosed with DRESS and treated accordingly. Over the next four months, she went on to have multiple hospitalizations with several admissions to the medical intensive care unit. She had numerous complications including significant facial edema, seizures, bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, hypovolemic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diabetic ketoacidosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, liver failure, and recurring DRESS rashes despite treatment with high-dose intravenous steroids and immunosuppressants. During this time, the patient developed a rare form of uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus not explained by autoantibody production or continued high-dose steroid use. Fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus is a sequela of DRESS that is poorly understood and rarely reported. When it occurs, it significantly and negatively affects patient prognosis and requires careful monitoring to assure proper glycemic control.

Case Report

Acute Bacterial Suppurative Thyroiditis following Fine Needle Aspiration: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Background. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules is a simple, reliable, and inexpensive procedure performed on suspicious thyroid nodules found in thyroid ultrasound (US). Acute bacterial suppurative thyroiditis is an uncommon complication of FNA which, however, can be life threatening. Case Presentation. A 49-year-old lady presented with fever and neck pain 1 month after FNA with biochemical evidence of thyrotoxicosis. Repeat US of the thyroid showed interval enlargement of the thyroid nodule, and the culture of the cystic fluid of repeat FNA grew Propionibacterium acnes. She responded well to bedside aspiration and 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy without requiring surgical intervention. Discussion. Acute bacterial suppurative thyroiditis following FNA has been increasingly reported in immunocompetent hosts. There are 2 peculiar features in our case: a smoldering course caused by an indolent organism and a significant time lag between initial FNA and clinical presentation. On literature review, it was found that the onset of acute bacterial suppurative thyroiditis after FNA can range from a few days to up to 3 months. Clinicians should be aware of this complication even if FNA has been performed a few months ago. Thyroid US and US-guided FNA are useful initial investigations. Conventional management of acute bacterial suppurative thyroiditis has been surgery combined with antimicrobial therapy. However, recently, a more conservative approach has been reported to be effective in the treatment of acute bacterial suppurative thyroiditis as well. Conclusion. Proper infection control practices are necessary in performing the FNA. Initial management (conservative versus surgical) of acute bacterial thyroiditis should be based on the patient’s clinical status and the extent of infective focus.

Case Reports in Endocrinology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision55 days
Acceptance to publication29 days
CiteScore0.800
Impact Factor-
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