Case Reports in Endocrinology
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Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision94 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore1.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.230
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Giant Pheochromocytoma Diagnosis Confounded by Amphetamine Use

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Case Reports in Endocrinology publishes case reports and case series related to the endocrine system and its associated diseases.

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Case Report

Topical Glucocorticoid Use and the Risk of Posttransplant Diabetes

Systemically administered glucocorticoids constitute an essential part of the immunosuppressive regimen for transplant recipients, yet their known risks of causing hyperglycemia or posttransplant diabetes require close monitoring and minimisation of use, when possible, to prevent detrimental effects on patient morbidity and graft survival. Topical glucocorticoids, on the other hand, are rarely considered to affect glucose metabolism and therefore seldomly monitored, despite their wide and in some cases, long-term use. We report a case of a renal transplant recipient presenting with acute hyperosmolar hyperglycemia after treatment with topical glucocorticoids and present a mini review of the literature.

Case Report

Development and Resolution of Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency after an Intra-Articular Steroid Injection

Corticosteroid injections are commonly indicated in inflammatory conditions involving the soft tissues, tendon sheaths, bursae, and joints. Local corticosteroids carry a lower risk of complications than systemic corticosteroid but may be systemically absorbed and subsequently suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This can cause secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) as well as iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. We report a 78-year-old female who presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms after a recent intra-articular steroid injection in her shoulder. She had hyponatremia, low morning cortisol, and failed to respond to high-dose cosyntropin. Further workup revealed the underlying cause to be SAI. Follow-up testing revealed a recovery of HPA responsiveness within 2 weeks of her initial diagnosis. Conclusion. Our case highlights how the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) can be suppressed with intra-articular steroids. The threshold to test corticosteroid users for adrenal insufficiency should be low in clinical practice, especially for those patients with nonspecific symptoms after steroid injections. Once diagnosed, temporary treatment with steroids may be required.

Case Report

BYPASS-OMA: Hypoglycemic Hyperinsulinemic Nesidioblastosis after Gastric Bypass Surgery—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

This rare case vignette describes hypoglycemic, hyperinsulinemic nesidioblastosis in a female patient with prior Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The patient presented with severe symptomatic hypoglycemia resistant to IV dextrose and diazoxide, requiring surgical resection. Traditional imaging found nonspecific findings, and biochemical analysis was inconsistent with insulinoma. A gallium-68 dotatate PET scan was utilized to successfully localize the tumor in the distal pancreas. She underwent laparoscopic resection of the distal pancreatic lesion with resolution of her symptoms and return to euglycemia. The histological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of nesidioblastosis. Nesidioblastosis is a rare complication of bariatric surgery that may be more clinically relevant with rising prevalence of obesity. Diagnosis with conventional imaging modalities may be challenging; however, the dotatate PET scan may have high utility in detecting lesions. It is essential for clinicians to consider nesidioblastosis in the differential diagnosis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic conditions and recognize there may be a link with increasing rates of bariatric surgery.

Case Report

Multifocal Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Involving Pituitary Masquerading as Crohn’s Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Background/Objective. We present a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with gastrointestinal involvement masquerading as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a patient who initially had features of central diabetes insipidus (CDI). Case Report. A 19-year-old male presented at 14 years of age with central diabetes insipidus. He subsequently developed panhypopituitarism and sellar-suprasellar mass, the biopsy of which was inconclusive. Secondary causes for hypophysitis were ruled out. Five years later, he developed perianal pus discharging sinuses, positive ASCA, and sacroiliitis. Rectal ulcer biopsy showed nonspecific inflammation and necrosis. Hence, he was managed as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Due to nonresponsiveness of symptoms, doubt about diagnosis was invoked and rectal ulcer biopsy was repeated, which then showed infiltration by Langerhans cells. Hence, he was diagnosed with LCH and showed resolution of symptoms on initiating steroids and vinblastine. Discussion. Gastrointestinal involvement by LCH is unusual and only rarely has represented a prominent clinical manifestation. In most cases, such involvement suggests widespread multisystem disease. Its distinctive morphologic and immunohistochemical features allow LCH to be distinguished from other inflammatory infiltrations found in mucosal biopsy specimens. Conclusion. Preceding CDI and hypopituitarism may predict LCH in patients with IBD-like diseases.

Case Report

Spontaneous Adrenal Hemorrhage with Mild Hypoadrenalism in a Patient Anticoagulated with Apixaban for Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

Background. Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a serious endocrine complication of antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS). Case Presentation. We report a 45-year-old man who presented with several deep venous thromboses and was initially treated with apixaban, who later developed bilateral AH. Laboratory findings were consistent with cortisol deficiency yet preserved aldosterone physiology. He was diagnosed with APLS and treated with warfarin. After 8 months of follow-up, he remained on cortisol replacement with no evidence of recovery. We reviewed PubMed/MEDLINE indexed articles from 1950 to 2022 for cases of AH in APLS patients on anticoagulation. Six cases of patients on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were reported. Discussion. The unique vasculature of the adrenal glands creates a “functional vascular dam” in the zona reticularis, which is susceptible to thrombosis in situ and hemorrhage. DOACs may further increase the risk of AH. Conclusion. Depending on the degree of adrenal involvement in AH, patients can present with partial or complete primary adrenal insufficiency. More data are needed to characterize adrenal function after AH, and the safety of DOAC versus warfarin in patients with APLS warrants further studies.

Case Report

Acute Sheehan’s Syndrome Presenting with Hyponatremia Followed by a Spontaneous Pregnancy

Background. Acute Sheehan’s syndrome is rare, as well as hyponatremia as its initial manifestation. In addition, spontaneous pregnancy in patients after Sheehan’s syndrome is unusual. To our knowledge, no cases of spontaneous pregnancy after acute Sheehan’s syndrome have been reported. We describe a case of Sheehan’s syndrome that presented with acute hyponatremia and a spontaneous pregnancy. Case. A 34-year-old female developed blood loss during delivery, which required a blood transfusion. On day seven postpartum, she presented with headaches, lethargy, and difficulty in breastfeeding. The workup showed hyponatremia (118 mEq/l), secondary hypothyroidism, and low prolactin levels. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pituitary necrosis. She was treated with NaCl, hydrocortisone (cortisol results were not available), and levothyroxine. Laboratory tests six weeks after discharge showed low IGF-1 and 8 AM cortisol and normal FT4, LH, FSH, and PRL levels. She was able to partially breastfeed until 4 months postpartum. Regular menstrual cycles started three months later. She became spontaneously pregnant one year later. Conclusion. Acute Sheehan’s syndrome should be considered in the evaluation of postpartum patients with suggestive symptoms. Physicians should be aware that hyponatremia could be an initial manifestation of Sheehan’s syndrome, which requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. Spontaneous pregnancy can occur after acute Sheehan’s syndrome.

Case Reports in Endocrinology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision94 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore1.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.230
Impact Factor-
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