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Case Reports in Endocrinology
Volume 2012, Article ID 841947, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/841947
Case Report

Effect of Prolonged Discontinuation of L-Thyroxine Replacement in a Child with Congenital Hypothyroidism

1Section of Endocrinology and Diabetes, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19134, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA
3Department of Emergency Medicine, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19134, USA

Received 13 January 2012; Accepted 16 February 2012

Academic Editors: T. Kita and R. Murray

Copyright © 2012 Rita Ann Kubicky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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