Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision131 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-

Bilateral Scapular Fractures Occurring as a Result of a First-Time Seizure

Read the full article

 Journal profile

Case Reports in Emergency Medicine publishes case reports and case series related to prehospital care, disaster preparedness and response, acute medical and paediatric emergencies, critical care, sports medicine, wound care, and toxicology.

 Editor spotlight

Case Reports in Emergency Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Case Report

Ruptured Tubo-Ovarian Pregnancy Presenting at 15 Weeks’ Gestation

Ectopic pregnancies develop outside of the uterus and lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality if they rupture. As the primary diagnostic tool for these presentations, ultrasound has a growing list of signs and measurements that help distinguish between intrauterine and ectopic pregnancies, the latter being exceedingly rare once a woman has entered her second trimester. The present case reports a series of Emergency Department visits by a woman carrying a second-trimester pregnancy—deemed intrauterine on transabdominal ultrasound due to gestational age and location—who developed massive hemoperitoneum and was diagnosed with a ruptured 15-week tubo-ovarian pregnancy on laparotomy. The discussion describes the sonographic findings that could have helped make the proper diagnosis, most notably mantle distance—the thickness of the myometrium surrounding the gestational sac—which would have correctly identified this pregnancy as ectopic.

Case Report

A Patient Presenting with Lower Extremity Paralysis due to Acute Aortic Occlusion

Acute aortic occlusion (AAO) is a rare and life-threatening condition that is rarely described in limited case series over the past several decades. The etiology and management are diverse across documented accounts, but prompt recognition facilitated by performing a thorough vascular and neurologic exam is critical to prevent delayed diagnosis and adverse outcomes. We report a patient who presented to the emergency department with the complaint of acute-onset lower extremity paralysis due to acute aortic occlusion. Her condition was rapidly diagnosed with a CT angiogram protocolized for aortic dissection and managed with anticoagulation and thrombectomy with eventual near complete recovery of her lower extremity function.

Case Report

Cerebral Arterial Gas Embolism due to Helium Inhalation from a High-Pressure Gas Cylinder

Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a rare but serious cause for acute neurologic deficit that occurs most often in divers who breathe compressed gas at depth or iatrogenically from a variety of invasive medical procedures. We present a rare case of CAGE caused by inhaling helium from an unregulated, high-pressure gas cylinder. Following inhalation, the patient experienced loss of consciousness, neurologic deficits, pneumomediastinum, and pneumothorax requiring transfer and treatment at a hyperbaric facility with resulting resolution of neurologic symptoms. This case highlights the importance of rapid diagnosis and hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO), facilitated by close coordination among community emergency departments, pediatric tertiary care centers, hyperbaric facilities, and poison control.

Case Report

A Case of Transvaginal Small Bowel Evisceration following Hysterectomy with Discussion of Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management

Transvaginal small bowel evisceration is a rare surgical emergency that requires urgent surgery to prevent bowel necrosis, sepsis, and death. It was first reported in 1864 by Hyernaux with less than 100 cases reported since the original publication. The overall mortality rate is reported as 5.6 percent. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of moderate abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding for 1 hour. The patient reported that she underwent a robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy 11 weeks prior for uterine fibroids. Visual examination revealed a loop of the small bowel coming from the superior aspect of her vagina. Literature reviews have noted a higher incidence of dehiscence following robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. It is important for the emergency physician to make the diagnosis, initiate prompt consultation with departments of obstetrics and gynecology and general surgery, and treat for potential infection.

Case Report

Intimo-Intimal Intussusception due to Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection Presenting as Cerebral Infarction

Complete circumferential dissection is a rare clinical presentation of aortic dissection, wherein the dissected flap has the potential to cause intimo-intimal intussusception, which can lead to several catastrophic complications. We report a case of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection with intimo-intimal intussusception causing unstable cerebral ischemic symptoms. An 82-year-old man was taken to another hospital with severe intermittent dizziness. Head magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple right-hemispheric cerebral infarctions. Computed tomography also showed a “missing flap,” indicating that the intimal flap was observed in the aortic root and arch but not in the ascending aorta. The patient was referred to our hospital for emergent surgery. Intraoperatively, the intimal tear was found to be circumferential, and the transected intima was folded and superimposed from the origin of the brachiocephalic artery to the aortic arch. Ascending aortic replacement and aortic valve replacement were performed; the postoperative course was good.

Case Report

Hampton’s Hump: A Notable Radiographic Finding in a Patient with Infectious Endocarditis

Infectious endocarditis is a relatively uncommon entity that may present with a variety of clinical scenarios, ranging from a stable patient with nonspecific symptoms to a critically ill patient suffering from embolic disease. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 35-year-old female who presented to the Emergency Department with gradually progressive dyspnea, weight loss, and lower extremity edema. As part of her initial evaluation, a chest radiograph was performed and demonstrated Hampton’s Hump, a peripheral wedge-shaped opacity consistent with a possible pulmonary infarct. Further diagnostic investigation in the Emergency Department led to an unanticipated diagnosis of infectious endocarditis. This case serves as an important reminder that nonspecific diagnostic findings need to be appropriately considered in context and is a rare demonstration of Hampton’s Hump associated with infectious endocarditis.

Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision131 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.