Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate42%
Submission to final decision102 days
Acceptance to publication54 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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Epileptic Seizure from Ginkgo Nut Intoxication in an Adult

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 Journal profile

Case Reports in Emergency Medicine publishes case reports and case series related to prehospital care, disaster preparedness and response, acute medical and paediatric emergencies, critical care, sports medicine, wound care, and toxicology.

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Case Reports in Emergency Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Aspergilloma Superimposed Infection on Lymphoid Interstitial Pneumonia

We describe a case of a 27-year-old female without any prior underlying immunodeficiency syndromes who presented with hemoptysis secondary to subacute invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and subsequently diagnosed with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP). CT chest demonstrated bilateral interstitial disease with patchy opacities and multiple large cysts and bullae. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically after surgical lung resection of the mycetoma containing cavitation. Therefore, LIP should be suspected in patients presenting with opportunistic infections in the setting of cystic lung disease.

Case Report

Cardiac Syncope with Anoxic Seizure Activity

This is a case report, which explores the presentation to the emergency department of a fit and well female with a known ventricular bigeminy. She presented with convulsive episodes. The working differential diagnosis was of possible cardiac syncope with anoxic seizure activity or neurogenically mediated arrhythmia secondary to subarachnoid haemorrhage. On further collateral history, the patient was on citalopram. The ECGs demonstrated PVCs of multiple morphologies that were transiently bidirectional, raising the possibility of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. The presentation of a young fit patient with syncope and seizure-like episodes should always raise concern for the admitting emergency medicine clinician of an underlying cardiac pathology.

Case Report

Successful Management of Airway and Esophageal Foreign Body Obstruction in a Child

Foreign body asphyxia is a serious clinical problem with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is relatively common among children, especially those younger than 3 years, because they have a high risk of aspirating foreign bodies owing to their tendency to place objects in their mouth and lack of a well-developed swallowing reflex. Moreover, the neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in pediatric patients remains generally poor. Here, we report an unusual pediatric case of asphyxial OHCA caused by foreign bodies obstructing the airway, complicating esophageal foreign body, with a neurologically favorable outcome. This case highlights the importance of adequate treatment for pediatric patients with OHCA, as well as the prompt and efficient management for pediatric patients with foreign bodies obstructing the airway and esophagus.

Case Report

Testicular Rupture Following Blunt Scrotal Trauma

Testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma is characterized by rupture of the tunica albuginea and extrusion of seminiferous tubules. This is a serious injury and appropriate evaluation and management are necessary both for symptom control, but also for preservation of the testicle. Clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. This case study describes the assessment and management of blunt testicular trauma in an adolescent lacrosse player.

Case Report

Retained Foreign Body Causing a Liver Abscess

Introduction. A liver abscess caused by fishbone ingestion is extremely rare in the Emergency Department. Case Report. We report a case of a middle-aged female who presented to the Emergency Department with nonspecific symptoms. Computed tomography showed a liver abscess that had formed secondary to a fishbone. The patient was treated conservatively initially and subsequently with percutaneous drainage and finally with open drainage. Her condition improved and she was discharged from the hospital with the foreign body still in-situ. Conclusion. This case is one of six cases in literature where the patient has been discharged successfully from the hospital with a retained fishbone. It also demonstrates the difficulty of diagnosing a foreign body causing a liver abscess and the multiple treatment modalities used to treat a liver abscess caused by fishbone.

Case Report

Adult Ileocolic Intussusception from the Appendix

Intussusception is more commonly considered in the pediatric patient with abdominal pain, but can occur in adults as well. Adult patients are more likely to have an underlying intra-abdominal pathology leading to the condition. We present an adult patient presenting with abdominal pain with ileocecal intussusception diagnosed on imaging and confirmed surgically. In this case, appendiceal pathology served as the lead point for the intussusception.

Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate42%
Submission to final decision102 days
Acceptance to publication54 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit