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Case Reports in Genetics
Volume 2011, Article ID 143132, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/143132
Case Report

Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) in a Man with Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

1Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, Davis Medical Center, University of California, 2825 50th Street, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
2Division of Human Genetics, Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Medicine, Diponegoro University, Jalan Dr. Sutomo No. 14, Semarang 50321, Indonesia
3Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
4Department of Pediatrics, Davis Medical Center, University of California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA

Received 16 September 2011; Accepted 19 October 2011

Academic Editors: A. Baumer and P. Saccucci

Copyright © 2011 Tanjung A. Sumekar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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