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Case Reports in Genetics
Volume 2014, Article ID 127258, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/127258
Case Report

Congenital Arthrogryposis: An Extension of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 Microdeletion Syndrome?

1Departments of Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, MS 4015, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
2Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
4King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia

Received 18 November 2013; Accepted 10 December 2013; Published 12 February 2014

Academic Editors: P. Morrison, S. Paracchini, and R. Perry

Copyright © 2014 K. M. Usrey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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