Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine
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Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
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Journal Citation Indicator0.130
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A Case of Esophago-Respiratory Fistula due to Inhalation Smoke Injury Diagnosed by Upper Endoscopy

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Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine publishes case reports and case series focusing on gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreas and biliary, and related cancers.

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Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Zinc Acetate Dihydrate Tablet-Associated Gastritis Occurring in a Post-Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient

A 65-year-old Japanese woman underwent umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Zinc acetate dihydrate tablets were administered for hypozincemia after transplantation, and vomiting and appetite loss occurred soon thereafter. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed mucosal redness, erosion, white coat adhesion, and ulcers. Although graft-versus-host disease, intestinal transplant-associated microangiopathy, and cytomegalovirus infection were considered as possible causes, we diagnosed the patient with zinc acetate dihydrate tablet-associated gastric mucosal alterations based on the endoscopic features. This case reinforces the notion that medication-associated gastric lesions should be suspected in patients taking zinc acetate dihydrate tablets.

Case Report

An Obscure Presence of Gastroduodenal Involvement in a Newly Diagnosed Ileocolic Crohn’s Disease Patient

Whereas typical Crohn’s disease is confined to the terminal ileum and presents with abdominal pain and diarrhea, gastroduodenal manifestations of Crohn’s disease are rare, with often asymptomatic patient presentations and inconclusive diagnostic testing. It is, however, a more severe form of Crohn’s disease and thus warrants treatment with steroids and biologics much earlier than its ileocolonic counterpart. We present the case of a young, otherwise healthy, male with newly diagnosed ileocolonic Crohn’s disease with concurrent gastroduodenal involvement that initially failed management with biologic agents. We discuss the clinical manifestations and often obscure pathology of gastroduodenal Crohn’s disease and highlight the necessity of performing a concurrent esophagogastroduodenoscopic evaluation on newly diagnosed ileocolonic Crohn’s disease to assess the presence of upper gastrointestinal involvement.

Case Report

McKittrick–Wheelock Syndrome: A Rare Case of Secretory Diarrhea

McKittrick–Wheelock syndrome commonly presents with a triad of chronic secretory diarrhea, electrolyte disturbances, and renal failure. Secretory diarrhea is due to active ion secretion secondary to secretagogue secretion (cyclic adenosine monophosphate and prostaglandin E2). The mainstay of treatment for these lesions is surgical since it will arrest the loss of electrolytes that may lead to serious clinical consequences. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as indomethacin may be used to decrease electrolyte secretion in patients that desire a nonsurgical approach. Our patient is unique in that this is the first case of a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia leading to MWS and progressing to circulatory collapse with severe electrolyte disturbances. Aggressive replacement of fluids and electrolytes is essential to the survival of these patients.

Case Report

Small Bowel Obstruction Conservatively Managed in Hospital-At-Home

In 2020, Mayo Clinic established an Advanced Care at Home (ACH) program. ACH is a virtual hybrid hospital-at-home (HaH) program that combines telemedicine with in-home care services by utilizing a state that is software-driven, vendor-mediate medical supply chain. The program initially focused on acute medical diagnosis but has expanded to oversee surgical and postsurgical patients with continued inpatient needs. Here, we report the first case of a small bowel obstruction (SBO) managed under a HaH program. A 52-year-old lady presented to the emergency department with symptoms suggestive of mechanical SBO. The diagnosis was confirmed with an abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan, and the patient was admitted to the hospital. Based on the patient’s presentation and laboratory results, the care team proceeded with conservative treatment including nasogastric tube (NG) placement and suctioning, intravenous (IV) fluid replacement, and daily laboratory studies. She spent the first hospital day in the physical hospital ward so that the surgical team could ensure stability clinically and no urgent need for surgical intervention. On hospital day two, she was transferred home with ACH where the NG suctioning and IV replacement therapy could continue, while the medical team conducted daily virtual visits to ensure continued improvement. Additionally, a paramedic and a nurse performed an in-person, head-to-toe assessment and administered medications to the patient twice daily. She spent 5 days in ACH getting acute care and then was discharged into a postacute phase equivalent to outpatient monitoring called the restorative phase. She was monitored remotely for the duration of the restorative phase for 10 more days, and then she recovered fully. This case highlights that high-acuity patients with SBO can receive invasive treatments like NG tube suction as well as be appropriately monitored for clinical decompensation by a virtual hybrid home hospital program which combines virtual care providers with an in-home vendor-mediated supply chain.

Case Report

Colovesical Fistula: An Uncommon Cause of Hematuria and Rectal Bleeding

Colovesical fistula is an infrequent complication of diverticular disease that presents with pneumaturia, fecaluria, dysuria and, rarely, hematuria or hematochezia. Here we present a case of concurrent hematuria and rectal bleeding arising from a diverticular bleed traversing a previously undiagnosed colovesical fistula. Other causes of colovesical fistula include Crohn’s disease, radiation, and malignancy, though it is most commonly caused by complicated diverticulitis as in this case. Computed tomography (CT) imaging, cystoscopy, and gastrograffin enema have been described as high-yield diagnostic tests. Interestingly, colonoscopy is only successful in diagnosing colovesical fistula in approximately 55% of cases. Management often requires surgical intervention, as in this case, given limited success with conservative management. Colovesical fistula should be considered in patients presenting with fecaluria, pneumaturia, and dysuria as well as in cases of hematuria.

Case Report

Gastric Pseudomelanosis: An Uncommon Finding

Gastric pseudomelanosis is a benign condition that has been characterized by pigment deposition within subepithelial macrophages inside the stomach wall. Occurrence of the condition is rare, with pseudomelanosis occurring more often within the duodenal mucosa. Few cases have reported pseudomelanosis within the gastric mucosa. We report a case of an 86-year-old female who presented with worsening iron deficiency anemia concerning for gastrointestinal bleeding. Her endoscopic evaluation was remarkable for a speckled pattern of dark pigmentation within the stomach, confirmed to be pseudomelanosis by histologic evaluation with pigment showing positive staining for iron.

Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate30%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.130
Impact Factor-
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